Sunday, December 2, 2012

Krugman: Don't Let The One Percent Off The Hook

Paul Krugman warns us about the latest fraudulent arguments against ending the Bush tax cuts for the rich, presented under the guise of responses to the deficit and the need for "shared sacrifice." Instead of ending tax cuts for billionaires, the argument goes, it's time for people to retire at an older age and take advantage of Medicare later. And instead of real progressive taxation, let's just limit deductions–an idea touted by the Romney campaign and, lately, by Republican governors. Krugman tells us why these plutocrat-friendly schemes won't work in "Class Wars of 2012":

Consider, as a prime example, the push to raise the retirement age, the age of eligibility for Medicare, or both. This is only reasonable, we’re told — after all, life expectancy has risen, so shouldn’t we all retire later? In reality, however, it would be a hugely regressive policy change, imposing severe burdens on lower- and middle-income Americans while barely affecting the wealthy. Why? First of all, the increase in life expectancy is concentrated among the affluent; why should janitors have to retire later because lawyers are living longer? Second, both Social Security and Medicare are much more important, relative to income, to less-affluent Americans, so delaying their availability would be a far more severe hit to ordinary families than to the top 1 percent.

Or take a subtler example, the insistence that any revenue increases should come from limiting deductions rather than from higher tax rates. The key thing to realize here is that the math just doesn’t work; there is, in fact, no way limits on deductions can raise as much revenue from the wealthy as you can get simply by letting the relevant parts of the Bush-era tax cuts expire. So any proposal to avoid a rate increase is, whatever its proponents may say, a proposal that we let the 1 percent off the hook and shift the burden, one way or another, to the middle class or the poor.

...So keep your eyes open as the fiscal game of chicken continues. It’s an uncomfortable but real truth that we are not all in this together; America’s top-down class warriors lost big in the election, but now they’re trying to use the pretense of concern about the deficit to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat. Let’s not let them pull it off.


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