Saturday, March 16, 2013

Saturday Night At The Liberal Curmudgeon: Remembering Alvin Lee



Alvin Lee, British rock and blues guitar master, recently passed away. Perhaps the highest point of his career was his performance with his band, Ten Years After, of "I'm Going Home" at Woodstock, 1969.  Proving that he lost none of his fire decades later, Lee above is shown performing "I'm Going Home" in Moscow, 1995, in a medley that included the rock classics "Blue Suede Shoes," "Whole Lotta Shakin'" and "Hound Dog." In 1971, he had his only Top 40 hit, "I'd Love To Change The World." To hear more of Alvin Lee live with Ten Years After, listen to their album "Undead."

2 comments:

Michael The Molar Maven said...

Certainly Ten Years After's Woodstock performance was legendary - a true archived highlight for those of us who were not at the festival. However,there was much, much more to this band and its leader, Alvin Lee. Your Saturday evening choice is definitive proof that Alvin Lee could re-create his magic at will. 'Undead' is a great choice, but I also recommend 'Alvin Lee in Tennessee', recorded in 2003 and released in 2004, on which Mr. Lee plays with, among others, Scotty Moore and D. J. Fontana from Elvis Presley's original backing band. Once again, your selection is a great indication of the appropriateness of that collaboration. I fear that the younger generation of music lovers will never know how much Alvin Lee will be missed by those of us who were there during his hey day.

Jeff Tone said...

I also believe that Alvin Lee, like Kim Simmonds, did not receive the recognition that was due to him. Read the Times obituary (the article has the link): "Mr. Lee was not as well known as other emerging British guitar stars of the era, including Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck and perhaps even Albert Lee, with whom he was occasionally confused (and with whom he once recorded alongside Jerry Lee Lewis). But he was among the nimblest when it came to musicianship."

The performance did indeed show Lee's ability to "re-create his magic at will," as you so well put it.