Thursday, May 8, 2014

Rick Perry Unsure If Botched Oklahoma Execution Was Inhumane

Convicted murderer and rapist Clayton Lockett writhed in agony following a lethal injection and died 43 minutes later, a procedure that was criticized by the UN commissioner for human rights. While Lockett's execution took place in Oklahoma, NBC's David Gregory questioned Gov. Rick Perry of Texas, whose state is number one in the use of the death penalty. While Perry acknowledged that the execution was botched, he professed not to know if it was inhumane. Watch:



GOVERNOR RICK PERRY: I think we have an appropriate process in place, from the standpoint of the appeals process, to make sure that due process is addressed. And the process of the actual execution I would suggest to you is very different from Oklahoma. We only use one drug. But I'm confident that the way that the executions are taken care of in the state of Texas are appropriate.

DAVID GREGORY: And humane?

GOVERNOR RICK PERRY: And humane.

DAVID GREGORY: Was this inhumane?

GOVERNOR RICK PERRY: I don't know whether it was inhumane or not, but it was botched. And I hope that not only the governor, the legislators will look at the process in Oklahoma.

DAVID GREGORY: But you don't even want, even somebody convicted of a heinous crime, you don't want to see the government responsible for forcing a heart attack because they couldn't inject the proper lethal drugs.

GOVERNOR RICK PERRY: There is an appropriate way to deal with this. And obviously, something went terribly wrong.

2 comments:

Michael J. Mand said...

I don't know how to respond to this except to re-assert emphatically my unwavering opposition to the death penalty on every level from humane, to fairness in application, to the practical. How can we preach that killing is wrong, and enforce that principle by killing? I understand the human desire for revenge, but that is why we no longer allow lynch mobs. Our justice system is designed to take emotion out of the penal code in the interest of the over-arching public good. The death penaly may address an individual, highly specific situation instantly (and we know that that is not the only way), but the practice creates so many more problems down the road. Not the least of which is America's claim to be the beacon of fairness and an example to the rest of the world. Yeah, right!

Jeff Tone said...

Excellent arguments, along with the ultimate point, the inevitability of executing the innocent.